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Notices

Devolution for Norfolk

Deal for Norfolk

Overview

Norfolk County Council and the Government have agreed, in principle, a new County Deal, to transfer funding and powers to Norfolk – a process known as devolution. This provides a unique and exciting opportunity to unlock significant funding and for decisions currently made in Whitehall to be made in Norfolk, for Norfolk.

Under a County Deal, Norfolk would benefit from a new Government investment fund including £20m per year over the next 30 years, and an additional £12.9m during the current Spending Review period (2024-25). In addition to the investment fund, Norfolk would also get control of the Adult Education Budget (just over £10m in 2022/23) and an un-ringfenced Transport and Maintenance Budget (approximately £40m per year). There would also be a county council leader, directly elected by the public and with no additional bureaucracy or changes to councils.

This Deal represents a real opportunity to unlock Norfolk’s potential, for the county take control of its own destiny and shape its own future, and to have a stronger voice nationally. If our Deal went ahead, we would have powers and finance to invest in areas such as better transport, skills, job opportunities, housing, and regeneration.

This could be just the start of further powers being devolved to Norfolk. Some examples of additional powers and responsibilities devolved in other areas of the country include greater powers over the NHS and social care and controls over the number of holiday homes in coastal areas.  Therefore, it is important to hear your views about this Deal and your ideas about priorities for Norfolk.

Discussion events are being held around the county from February 16th.

Norfolk County Deal event: Diss Library (Daytime Session)

From 10 Mar 2023 at 10:00 to 10 Mar 2023 at 12:00

Norfolk County Deal event: Diss Library (Evening Session)

From 10 Mar 2023 at 16:00 to 10 Mar 2023 at 18:00

Click here to see more

Meeting Notes – South Norfolk Village Clusters Consultation Meeting

NOTES ON VILLAGE CLUSTERS OPEN MEETING 27th FEBRUARY 2023

As Chair of the PC Dr McMurray outlined the background to the current stage of the consultation and explained how representations of objections could be made. She made it clear that representations to the council about the plan could only be regarding the properness of the procedure – if it is legally compliant, if it is sound and if it complies with the duty to co-operate. 

When asked about engaging a lawyer Dr McMurray said it would be too expensive and would probably serve no purpose.

Despite the consultation being about the properness of the procedure many views about the problems with site were expressed – extra traffic, pressure on the oversubscribed school, school parking and the already existing dangers, the width of the road and the junction with the A1066. Dr McMurray was unable to answer the question that if the site had been described  as level and it was not that would constitute a legal failing. She suggested that people make any comments they chose to.

She was unable to say at this time when development might start but made it clear that it would have to go through the normal planning process before it did.

Norfolk Libraries to join Warm Welcome campaign

Norfolk Libraries Service will be making all 47 of its libraries available as part of the Warm Welcome campaign. The scheme supports free, warm, and welcoming spaces in communities across the UK.

Warm Welcome is a national campaign which will work with community spaces, including churches and faith groups, businesses, and local authorities, to ensure that nobody is left to suffer on their own this winter.

Libraries across Norfolk remain open for all and provide a space for people to sit in comfort and access a variety of services on offer. These include reading, doing a jigsaw, playing a board game, or joining in Just a Cuppa or activities.

Cllr Margaret Dewsbury, cabinet member for communities and partnerships, said: “Our libraries have a long history of being welcoming spaces for all, most recently evidenced by the awarding of Library of Sanctuary status for the Millennium Library in Norwich.

“We are proud to be able to join the Warm Welcome campaign, alongside the other support which is on offer from our libraries.”

Other free services available at Norfolk libraries include:

  • Tea, coffee, instant soup, and hot chocolate are available during staffed hours
  • Library staff and volunteers can provide visitors with trusted information about other support which is available
  • A variety of bags are available for free, with no questions asked

Open Library gives people access to libraries for a total of 69 hours a week at most libraries, giving visitors access to the library, its books, computers, and spaces, even when the building is unstaffed.

You can find your nearest library at www.norfolk.gov.uk/findalibrary

Winter Flooding Notice

The winter flooding season is with us once again.

Bressingham and Fersfield Parish Council continues to work with Norfolk County Council, South Norfolk Council and local landowners to assess and control the risk of flooding.

However, it is in all our interests to be prepared to protect our own homes.

Make sure that ditches on your property are cleared and free flowing, if you are able.

Consider obtaining sandbags, to protect your property from water ingress: there is a small number available to take away, on a first come first served basis, behind Bressingham Village Hall.

SNC Leader replies to Parish Council objection

From: John Fuller <john@johnfuller.org.uk>
Date: Thursday, 16 June 2022 at 10:40
To: Amanda McMurray <amanda.mcmurray@bressinghamandfersfield.org>
Cc: James Easter <easter255@gmail.com>
Subject: Re: OBJECTION to East Anglia Green Energy Enablement proposal – Bressingham and Fersfield Parish Council

Hello Amanda

I arranged for this matter to be discussed as an urgent item at our scheduled Cabinet meeting On Monday.   In advance I had contacted a number of objectors and gave them the opportunity to make some valuable contributions to the debate.  These will be captured and incorporated into the Council’s response to the preliminary consultation.

It was explained to us by officials that the ‘consultation’ process so far carries little weight.  I would characterise it as a smoking-out process.  Its aim to ask local people what they think of the proposals has certainly succeeded.   But not in the way that they anticipated!

We have been able to draw attention to the lack of meaningful consultation, not the detailed consideration of all the issues that should have been taken into account at the earliest stage. There seems to be scant attention given to landscape, heritage or natural assets.   There has been no obvious consideration of alternative options.  The economic impacts on Bressingham and Tibenham Airfield are completely absent.  And nobody has given a thought for Diss which will be surrounded on all sides.

Given the scant detail there is no alternative but to object against what is before us.   There will be a Public Enquiry where all the issues will be aired and we will ensure that all the things that you have raised and those who have raised concerns alongside you will be heard.

National Grid spurned our advice and offers to put them in touch with interested parties and organisations.  Sadly their afternoon consultation in Mulbarton Village Hall was wholly inadequate.   We will hold them to account.

The key next step will be the public enquiry.  We have all identified the key issues that need to be addressed at that point, one of which will be consideration of offshore.  It’s clearly our preferred option.  However, I don’t think it would be wise to focus ENTIRELY on that one to the exclusion of all other matters in case it becomes technically infeasible and then we end up with the plan that’s before us unaltered.

I am grateful to you for contacting me and we shall shortly be publishing our response to the issue and which we will publicise on 16th June.


John

Councillor John Fuller OBE
Leader of South Norfolk District Council. Member for Brooke Ward
The Old Hall Coach House The Street  Brooke  Norwich  Norfolk  NR15 1LB
Phone +44 1508 558280 John's Mobile +44 7500 662255
john@johnfuller.org.uk    www.johnfuller.org.uk

Dear Councillor Fuller,

I write as Chair of Bressingham and Fersfield Parish Council, representing the views of our Parishioners and on behalf of my fellow Councillors.

We oppose the East Anglia “Green” Energy Enablement proposal, proposing construction of overhead transmission line from Dunston to Tilbury and passing through our Parish.

We urge South Norfolk District Council to oppose the scheme and to take action to ensure that it does not proceed, reflecting the views, not only of our Parishioners, but of a large proportion of your South Norfolk residents.

There is clear strategic alignment and public interest in your objecting to this proposal on the grounds of its significant negative impact on quality of life and the irreversible damage that it will cause to our environment:

  1. It is contrary to policies DM3.8 and DM4.5 of the Local Plan, in that its construction would damage the landscape, destroy views across farmland and open countryside and will be detrimental to its character through the erosion of its open nature.
  1. It is contrary to Planning Enforcement Strategy which states that development should not:

1.       affect the amenity of nearby residents or

2.       cause serious and irreversible harm to the environment.

Our Parishioners have told us, variously, of their alarm, bewilderment and outright rage at the proposal.

They have also told us of their wholehearted opposition to the irreversible damage that will undoubtedly occur, both during and after construction, if the proposed construction were allowed to proceed, including:

1.       Destruction of Amenity: The proposal – a desk-based exercise – states specifically that the choice of infrastructure and selection of a “preferred” route are cheapest and the fastest to build.

It makes no consideration of the practicalities of construction or of maintenance requirements in our region and no account whatsoever of environmental, economic or “human” factors, beyond identifying where population density might be lower.

The line of 50m high lattice steel pylons would run alongside an important SSSI situated within the designated Special Landscapes Area across the Waveney Valley at Bressingham, resulting in loss of habitats, long-term damage to fields and meadows,

The line of 50m high steel pylons will carve through our landscape, breach our open skies and damage the quality of life of people that live near its route or enjoy visiting it.

2.       Damage the local economy through loss of local businesses and tourism: Blooms of Bressingham’s railway and world-famous garden will be crossed by the proposed power line, the development is expected to destroy their weddings and events services. Local farmers’ operations are affected through South Norfolk.

3.       Damage to the Environment

CO2 Emissions

National Grid defines green energy as coming from natural sources https://www.nationalgrid.com/stories/energy-explained/what-is-green-energy .

East Anglia Green’s claim of being a green energy proposal focuses on the relatively low carbon dioxide emissions coming from wind power generation (compared to fossil fuel generation). However, it does not consider mitigation of leakage that is inherent from electricity distribution networks, nor does it consider the embodied CO2 of raw materials within the network infrastructure, or the CO2 emissions generated from the construction and maintenance processes.

4.       Damage to Local Infrastructure:

Local infrastructure around the proposed construction area in our Parish consists mainly of rural single-track lanes, used by local people and businesses and also frequented by walkers, cyclists and horse-riders.

They are unsuitable for heavy goods vehicles and plant; any such use would cause significant damage and would put other road users at risk of accident and injury.

Yours sincerely,

Amanda McMurray

——————————————————

Amanda McMurray PhD MBA MIoD IMC

Bressingham and Fersfield Parish Councillor

Email: amanda.mcmurray@bressinghamandfersfield.org

Tel: +44 7774 830422

Parish Council Objection to East Anglia GREEN

From: “Planning (SNC)” <Planning.snc@southnorfolkandbroadland.gov.uk>
Date: Wednesday, 15 June 2022 at 12:00
To: “amanda.mcmurray@bressinghamandfersfield.org” <amanda.mcmurray@bressinghamandfersfield.org>
Subject: RE: OBJECTION to East Anglia Green Energy Enablement proposal – Bressingham and Fersfield Parish Council

Good morning

Thank you for your email in respect of the East Anglia GREEN project.

The Council following its Cabinet meeting on Monday will be responding to National Grid’s non-statutory consultation for its proposed National Significant Infrastructure Project East Anglia GREEN Objecting to the proposed development.

The link to the recording of the Cabinet meeting is https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZciRgwo84-iPyRImsTCIng   for your information.

The Council’s response will be uploaded to planning application no. 2022/1116 which it has created for openness and to enable it to be viewed in the public domain, once it has been sent to National Grid.

South Norfolk Council is not the determining Authority as the proposal is a National Significant Infrastructure Project (NSIP) determined by the Secretary of State, at the Cabinet meeting we referred to the 6 stages of the NSIP planning process and I have provided attached the link to the Planning Inspectorates web page for your information.    

https://infrastructure.planninginspectorate.gov.uk/application-process/the-process/

The Council will not be forwarding the comments you have made and I would suggest if you haven’t already done so, you may wish to send these directly to National Grid as part of the consultation, which closes tomorrow 16 June 2022 emails to   EastAngliaGREEN@nationalgrid.com

Kind regards

John

John Oakley
Business Support Officer: Technical
e john.oakley@southnorfolkandbroadland.gov.uk  


From: Amanda McMurray <amanda.mcmurray@bressinghamandfersfield.org>
Sent: 15 June 2022 10:27
To: John Fuller <John.Fuller@southnorfolkandbroadland.gov.uk>; Claire Curtis <Claire.Curtis@southnorfolkandbroadland.gov.uk>; Tracey.lincoln@southnorfolkandbroadland.gov.uk
Cc: James Easter <James.Easter@southnorfolkandbroadland.gov.uk>; bandf.pc@outlook.com (External) <bandf.pc@outlook.com>
Subject: OBJECTION to East Anglia Green Energy Enablement proposal – Bressingham and Fersfield Parish Council

Dear Councillor Fuller,

I write as Chair of Bressingham and Fersfield Parish Council, representing the views of our Parishioners and on behalf of my fellow Councillors.

We oppose the East Anglia “Green” Energy Enablement proposal, proposing construction of overhead transmission line from Dunston to Tilbury and passing through our Parish.

We urge South Norfolk District Council to oppose the scheme and to take action to ensure that it does not proceed, reflecting the views, not only of our Parishioners, but of a large proportion of your South Norfolk residents.

There is clear strategic alignment and public interest in your objecting to this proposal on the grounds of its significant negative impact on quality of life and the irreversible damage that it will cause to our environment:

  • It is contrary to policies DM3.8 and DM4.5 of the Local Plan, in that its construction would damage the landscape, destroy views across farmland and open countryside and will be detrimental to its character through the erosion of its open nature.
  • It is contrary to Planning Enforcement Strategy which states that development should not:
  • affect the amenity of nearby residents or
  • cause serious and irreversible harm to the environment.

Our Parishioners have told us, variously, of their alarm, bewilderment and outright rage at the proposal.

They have also told us of their wholehearted opposition to the irreversible damage that will undoubtedly occur, both during and after construction, if the proposed construction were allowed to proceed, including:

  1. Destruction of Amenity: The proposal – a desk-based exercise – states specifically that the choice of infrastructure and selection of a “preferred” route are cheapest and the fastest to build.

It makes no consideration of the practicalities of construction or of maintenance requirements in our region and no account whatsoever of environmental, economic or “human” factors, beyond identifying where population density might be lower.

The line of 50m high lattice steel pylons would run alongside an important SSSI situated within the designated Special Landscapes Area across the Waveney Valley at Bressingham, resulting in loss of habitats, long-term damage to fields and meadows,

The line of 50m high steel pylons will carve through our landscape, breach our open skies and damage the quality of life of people that live near its route or enjoy visiting it.

  1. Damage the local economy through loss of local businesses and tourism: Blooms of Bressingham’s railway and world-famous garden will be crossed by the proposed power line, the development is expected to destroy their weddings and events services. Local farmers’ operations are affected through South Norfolk.
  1. Damage to the Environment

CO2 Emissions

National Grid defines green energy as coming from natural sources https://www.nationalgrid.com/stories/energy-explained/what-is-green-energy .

East Anglia Green’s claim of being a green energy proposal focuses on the relatively low carbon dioxide emissions coming from wind power generation (compared to fossil fuel generation). However, it does not consider mitigation of leakage that is inherent from electricity distribution networks, nor does it consider the embodied CO2 of raw materials within the network infrastructure, or the CO2 emissions generated from the construction and maintenance processes.

  1. Damage to Local Infrastructure:

Local infrastructure around the proposed construction area in our Parish consists mainly of rural single-track lanes, used by local people and businesses and also frequented by walkers, cyclists and horse-riders.

They are unsuitable for heavy goods vehicles and plant; any such use would cause significant damage and would put other road users at risk of accident and injury.

Yours sincerely,

Amanda McMurray